President
PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE
www.rochdalevillagecivicassociation.org.
HON. CLIFTON STANLEY DIAZ, PRESIDENT
HON. CLIFTON STANLEY DIAZ
L - Picture: Hon. Clifton Stanley Diaz, R.V.C.A. President with the Hon.Baldwin Spencer, the Prime Minister of Antigua & Barbuda at the CARICOM Conference held in Jamaica, New York
Then Sgt. Clifton Stanley Diaz being honored at the the Pentagon by the Air Force Chief of Staff upon being selected a United States Air Force Outstanding Airman of the Year in 1980.
(L to R) Shirley Diaz, wife of RVCA President Cllifton Stanley Diaz (R) visiting the Washington D.C. office of Diaz's idol - U.S. Senator Edward M. Kennedy of Massachusetts (C). In 1964  Diaz worked as a staff person in the New York State Senate Campaign of Sen. Robert F. Kennedy at 9 East 42nd Street and later in Kennedy's 1968 Presidential Campaign.
R.V.C.A. President Clifton Stanley Diaz (C) gets together with his older two brothers: (L to R) Richard Stanley and David Diaz.
Hon. Clifton Stanley Diaz receiving an award posing with his mother, Mrs. Gwedolyn Diaz Stanley.
R.V.C.A. President Clifton Stanley Diaz (2nd R) poses for a picture with his mother Ms. Gwendolyn Diaz Stanley after she received a Community Service Award.  Others in photo include (Lto R) Richard Stanley - Diaz's Brother; David Diaz - Diaz's brother; Assemblywoman Vivian Cook; Mrs. Gwendolyn Diaz Stanley - Diaz's mother; Julia Stanley (deceased) - Diaz's sister; Clifton Stanley Diaz and Diaz friend NYC Police Sgt. McIntyre.
R.V.C.A. President Clifton Stanley Diaz's cousin, Hon. Harold Lovell, the Deputy Prime Minister of Antigua & Barbuda and the Minister of Finance, Economy and Public Administration posing with no other than television personality Oprah Winfrey at Antigua's Airport. Oprah is know for taking frequent vacation trips to in Antigua & Barbuda.
R.V.C.A. President Clifton Stanley Diaz poses with his cousin the Hon. Harold Lovell, (Diplomat) the Deputy Prime Minister of Antigua & Barbuda and the Minister of Finance, Economy and Public Administration at the Antigua & Barbuda 25th Anniversary Independence Dinner Dance at the Bronx Botanical Gardens in the Bronx.
Hon. Deborah Mae-Lovell, (Diplomat)
Ms. Gwendolyn Diaz Stanley, mother of RVCA Civic Association President, the Hon. Clifton Stanley Diaz, conversates with their cousin Ruth Freeman at the the Annual Antigua & Barbuda Independence Dinner Dance in the Bronx.
U.S. AIR FORCE  PHOTOS

SGT. CLIFTON STANLEY DIAZ
ANTIGUA & BARBUDA PHOTOS
COAT OF ARMS
DIAZ'S TWO ANTIGUA & BARBUDA
BROTHER & SISTER DIPLOMATIC COUSINS TEAM
Hon. Harold Lovell, (Diplomat)
FAMILY PHOTOS
THE PRIME MINISTER OF ANTIGUA  & BARBUDA
POLITICAL / POLICE PHOTOS
U.S. SENATOR EDWARD M. KENNEDY
SGT. DIAZ LEAVING THE PENTAGON AFTER MEETING WITH U.S. AIR FORCE CHIEF OF STAFF
NYC FORMER MAYOR DAVID DINKINS
(L to R)  NYC Former Police Commissioner Lee P. Brown,  Former RV Board First Vice President Ron Ellerbee, Former NYC Mayor David Dinkins and RVCA President Clifton Stanley Diaz
NYC FORMER MAYOR DAVID DINKINS & SOUTHEAST POLITICAL POWER STRUCTURE
COME TO ROCHDALE VILLAGE'S 25TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION
R- Picture:  Hon.Baldwin Spencer, the Prime Minister of Antigua & Barbuda with the Hon. Clifton Stanley Diaz at the NYC Antigua & Barbuda Conference & Homecoming at the City College of New York.
NEIL MICHEAL DIAZ
Hon. Clifton Stanley Diaz holds his second son, Neil Micheal Diaz who was also born at North Shore Long Island Jewish Hospital in Queens County, New York.
CLIFTON STANLEY DIAZ, JR.
Hon. Clifton Stanley Diaz holds his first son, Clifton Stanley Diaz, Jr. who was born at North Shore Long Island Jewish Hospital in Queens County, New York.
THE DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER OF ANTIGUA  & BARBUDA
AND THE MINISTER OF FINANCE, ECONOMY AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION
THE AMBASSADOR OF ANTIGUA  & BARBUDA
FOR THE ORGANIZATION OF AMERICAN STATES
SGT. DIAZ RECEIVES THE HUNDRED CLUB OF DAYTON, OHIO AWARD
FOR OUTSTANDING PUBLIC SAFETY OFFICERS AND SUPERVISORS
Then Sgt. Clifton Stanley Diaz (back row - 4th from left) takes group picture with Outsatanding Public Safety Officers who were honored for being the best Puiblic Safety Officers in the City of Dayton, Ohio. Diaz was recognized for running the best Crime Prevention and Community Relations Program in the Police Category.  Two years earlier he was honored by the U.S. Air Force for having the best Crime Prevention and Community Relations Program in the U. S. Air Force, the honor included a trip to the Pentagon and White House. 
R.V.C.A. President Clifton Stanley Diaz poses with his two young sons (L to R) Clifton Stanley Diaz, Jr. and Neil Micheal Diaz outside Allen A. M.E. Church after church services. 
(L to R)  Rochdale Village Board Member Raymond Evans and Ronald J. Ellerbee; Former New York City Council Deputy Majority Leader Archie Springer; Unidentied Person; New York City Deputy Mayor Mollen; Congressman Floyd H. Flake; Assemblywoman Barbara Clark; NYC Police Commissioner Lee Brown; New York City Mayor David N. Dinkins; Community Leader Ed Lewis; Rochdale Resident Mildred Goodman; New York Assemblyman Edward Abramson, Rochdale Village Board Chairman Clifton Stanley Diaz; Councilman Thomas White, Jr. and New York State Senate Minority Leader Malcom Smith.
SGT. DIAZ CHECKING GARAGE BREAK-IN AT THE
BASE MILITARY HOUSING AREA
LITTLE BOY ADMIRES AND ASK SGT. DIAZ
QUESTIONS ABOUT HIS SHINING BADGE
SGT. DIAZ  TALKS TO LITTLE CHILDREN ABOUT
CHILDREN SAFETY TIPS
SGT. DIAZ  LEAVING U.S . DISTRICT COURTHOUSE
ON DWI AND DRUG CASES
SGT. DIAZ REVIEWS DRUG CASE WITH
DOD POLICE SERGEANT
SGT. DIAZ  DISCUSS  DWI AND DRUG CASES IN
U.S . DISTRICT COURTHOUSE WITH JUDGE AND COURT OFFICER
SGT. DIAZ  REVIEWS MONTHLY CRIME
STATISTICS REPORTS WITH HIS POLICE CHIEF
SGT. DIAZ PROVIDING HIS POLICE EXPLORER CADETS
THEIR POST ASSIGNMENTS
SGT. DIAZ  AND FELLOW POLICE OFFICER
CHECK A SUSPECTED DWI DRIVER
SGT. DIAZ  CHECKS PROPER UNIFORM APPREANCE
OF HIS POLICE EXPLORER CADETS
SGT. DIAZ  REVIEWS ASSIGNMENT WITH HIS
POLICE EXPLORER CADETS LOOKING FOR A LOST CHILD
SGT. DIAZ  TAKES HIS POLICE EXPLORER CADETS
FOR A POLICE RIDE ALONG
SGT. DIAZ  WITH THE KELLY AIR FORCE BASE - SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS
POLICE EXPLORER CADETS THEIR DURING GRADUATION CEREMONY
POST RECEIVED NATIONAL REGONITION AS A
NATIONAL HONOR UNIT OF THE YEAR
OUTSTANDING AIRMAN OF THE YEAR RIBBON
SGT. DIAZ  VISITS WITH  CHILDREN AT DAY CARE CENTER
SGT. DIAZ  TICKETING ABANDONED VEHICLE BEFORE TOWING IT
SGT. DIAZ  ADMITS CARS INTO KELLY AIR FORCE BASE
SGT. DIAZ  LOOKS AT DAMAGE TO STORAGE ROOM WINDOW
SGT. DIAZ  REVIEWS COURT CASE WITH U.S. ATTORNEY
SGT. DIAZ WITH FELLOW POLICE OFFICERS
SGT. DIAZ IN U.S. AIR FORCE UNIFORM
SGT. DIAZ AT WORK IN HIS IN U.S. AIR FORCE SECURITY POLICE OFFICE.
IN THE BACKGROUND ARE SOME OF THE NUMEROUS AWARDS HE HAS RECEIVED AS A NATIONALLY RECOGNIZED EXPERT IN CRIME PREVENTION AND COMMUNITY RELATIONS
SGT. DIAZ IN U.S. AIR FORCE
DINING OUT SEMI FORMAL UNIFORM
SGT. DIAZ SHOWS A BASE HOUSING RESIDENT
THE BEST LOCK TO USE
SGT. DIAZ SHOWS CHILDREN AT THE CHILD CARE CENTER
HOW A RADAR GUN WORKS
SGT. DIAZ SHOWS WITH FELLOW SECURITY POLICE OFFICER GRADUATES OF THE PRESTIGOUS
NATIONAL CRIME PREVENTION INSTITUTE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF LOUISVILLE
SGT. DIAZ  WITH THE WRIGHT- PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE - DAYTON, OHIO
POLICE EXPLORER CADETS  DURING THEIR GRADUATION CEREMONY
The Diaz family poses with the Fernandez family in this old undated wedding photo of Clifton Stanley Diaz's Aunt's and Uncle (Ella Fernandez and Gilbert Fernandez) - pictured at the front center row.   In the same location next to Diaz's Aunt (Ella Fernandez) is his other Aunt (Pearl Diaz) and next to her is Clifton Stanley Diaz's Grandmother (Beatrice Diaz).  In the back center top row is Clifton Stanley Diaz's Grandfather David Diaz and next to him is Diaz's Mother - Ms. Gwendolyn Diaz.



Racial Views: Poll Shows Majority
Harbor Prejudice Against Blacks


By SONYA ROSS and JENNIFER AGIESTA
10/27/12 11:47 AM ET EDT




WASHINGTON — Racial attitudes have not improved in the four years since the United States elected its first black president, an Associated Press poll finds, as a slight majority of Americans now express prejudice toward blacks whether they recognize those feelings or not.
Those views could cost President Barack Obama votes as he tries for re-election, the survey found, though the effects are mitigated by some people's more favorable views of blacks.

Racial prejudice has increased slightly since 2008 whether those feelings were measured using questions that explicitly asked respondents about racist attitudes, or through an experimental test that measured implicit views toward race without asking questions about that topic directly.

In all, 51 percent of Americans now express explicit anti-black attitudes, compared with 48 percent in a similar 2008 survey. When measured by an implicit racial attitudes test, the number of Americans with anti-black sentiments jumped to 56 percent, up from 49 percent during the last presidential election. In both tests, the share of Americans expressing pro-black attitudes fell.

"As much as we'd hope the impact of race would decline over time ... it appears the impact of anti-black sentiment on voting is about the same as it was four years ago," said Jon Krosnick, a Stanford University professor who worked with AP to develop the survey.

Most Americans expressed anti-Hispanic sentiments, too. In an AP survey done in 2011, 52 percent of non-Hispanic whites expressed anti-Hispanic attitudes. That figure rose to 57 percent in the implicit test. The survey on Hispanics had no past data for comparison.
The AP surveys were conducted with researchers from Stanford University, the University of Michigan and NORC at the University of Chicago.

Experts on race said they were not surprised by the findings.
"We have this false idea that there is uniformity in progress and that things change in one big step. That is not the way history has worked," said Jelani Cobb, professor of history and director of the Institute for African-American Studies at the University of Connecticut. "When we've seen progress, we've also seen backlash."

Obama has tread cautiously on the subject of race, but many African-Americans have talked openly about perceived antagonism toward them since Obama took office. As evidence, they point to events involving police brutality or cite bumper stickers, cartoons and protest posters that mock the president as a lion or a monkey, or lynch him in effigy.
"Part of it is growing polarization within American society," said Fredrick Harris, director of the Institute for Research in African-American Studies at Columbia University. "The last Democrat in the White House said we had to have a national discussion about race. There's been total silence around issues of race with this president. But, as you see, whether there is silence, or an elevation of the discussion of race, you still have polarization. It will take more generations, I suspect, before we eliminate these deep feelings."
Overall, the survey found that by virtue of racial prejudice, Obama could lose 5 percentage points off his share of the popular vote in his Nov. 6 contest against Republican challenger Mitt Romney. But Obama also stands to benefit from a 3 percentage point gain due to pro-black sentiment, researchers said. Overall, that means an estimated net loss of 2 percentage points due to anti-black attitudes.

The poll finds that racial prejudice is not limited to one group of partisans. Although Republicans were more likely than Democrats to express racial prejudice in the questions measuring explicit racism (79 percent among Republicans compared with 32 percent among Democrats), the implicit test found little difference between the two parties. That test showed a majority of both Democrats and Republicans held anti-black feelings (55 percent of Democrats and 64 percent of Republicans), as did about half of political independents (49 percent).

Obama faced a similar situation in 2008, the survey then found.
The AP developed the surveys to measure sensitive racial views in several ways and repeated those studies several times between 2008 and 2012.

The explicit racism measures asked respondents whether they agreed or disagreed with a series of statements about black and Hispanic people. In addition, the surveys asked how well respondents thought certain words, such as "friendly," "hardworking," "violent" and "lazy," described blacks, whites and Hispanics.

The same respondents were also administered a survey designed to measure implicit racism, in which a photo of a black, Hispanic or white male flashed on the screen before a neutral image of a Chinese character. The respondents were then asked to rate their feelings toward the Chinese character. Previous research has shown that people transfer their feelings about the photo onto the character, allowing researchers to measure racist feelings even if a respondent does not acknowledge them.

Results from those questions were analyzed with poll takers' ages, partisan beliefs, views on Obama and Romney and other factors, which allowed researchers to predict the likelihood that people would vote for either Obama or Romney. Those models were then used to estimate the net impact of each factor on the candidates' support.

All the surveys were conducted online. Other research has shown that poll takers are more likely to share unpopular attitudes when they are filling out a survey using a computer rather than speaking with an interviewer. Respondents were randomly selected from a nationally representative panel maintained by GfK Custom Research.

Overall results from each survey have a margin of sampling error of approximately plus or minus 4 percentage points. The most recent poll, measuring anti-black views, was conducted Aug. 30 to Sept. 11.

Andra Gillespie, an Emory University political scientist who studies race-neutrality among black politicians, contrasted the situation to that faced by the first black mayors elected in major U.S. cities, the closest parallel to Obama's first-black situation. Those mayors, she said, typically won about 20 percent of the white vote in their first races, but when seeking reelection they enjoyed greater white support presumably because "the whites who stayed in the cities ... became more comfortable with a black executive."

"President Obama's election clearly didn't change those who appear to be sort of hard-wired folks with racial resentment," she said.

Negative racial attitudes can manifest in policy, noted Alan Jenkins, an assistant solicitor general during the Clinton administration and now executive director of the Opportunity Agenda think tank.

"That has very real circumstances in the way people are treated by police, the way kids are treated by teachers, the way home seekers are treated by landlords and real estate agents," Jenkins said.

Hakeem Jeffries, a New York state assemblyman and candidate for a congressional seat being vacated by a fellow black Democrat, called it troubling that more progress on racial attitudes had not been made. Jeffries has fought a New York City police program of "stop and frisk" that has affected mostly blacks and Latinos but which supporters contend is not racially focused.

"I do remain cautiously optimistic that the future of America bends toward the side of increased racial tolerance," Jeffries said. "We've come a long way, but clearly these results demonstrate there's a long way to go."

___


AP News Survey Specialist Dennis Junius contributed to this report.


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  DIAZ & FERNANDEZ FAMILIES
CLIFTON STANLEY DIAZ, JR.
WITH NEW YORK STATE POLICE TROOPERS
AT THE JACOB K. JAVITS AUTOMOBILE SHOW
1980 - DESIGNATED U.S. AIR FORCE OUTSTANDING AIRMAN - 1980