About Us


For more than fifty-five years the air in a comparatively quiet but progressively decaying area of Queens just outside Jamaica, reverberated to the thunder of horse’s hooves as they beat around an elliptical course known as the Jamaica Race Track. Then progress in the form of a population-explosion out stripped the facilities of the Jamaica track, and on August 1, 1959 the last race was run at Jamaica. The possibilities of erecting a large housing development on the 170 acre site of the Jamaica track was the vision of Robert Moses, the then Chairman of the Slum Clearance Committee and City Construction Coordinator.  The Jamaica Race Track was demolished in 1960 under the administration of Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller to make way for the Rochdale Village complex, which was built for $86 million as a middle income cooperative.  

Since Rochdale Village was to be the largest single cooperative housing community ever to be undertaken at that time, considerable thought was given to endowing it with an appropriate name. Because it was expected that the development would set a precedent for establishment of future “cooperative villages” around the country, the name most fitting seemed to be that of the little English village of Rochdale which gave birth to the Cooperative movement in 1844. This lead to the Rochdale Principles of Cooperation. Thus did Rochdale Village derive its name.

The architect’s concept for Rochdale Village was an attractive community covering 122 city blocks, that would provide the residents with the park-like setting and facilities of suburbia within the limits of the urban Jamaica area.

Rochdale Village in southeast Queens opened in 1963 ( pop. over 25,000), lying within South Jamaica and bounded to the north by Baisley Boulevard and Bedell Street, to the east by Bedell Street, to the south by 137th Avenue, and to the west by Guy R. Brewer Boulevard. When the village first opened in 1963 it was the largest private housing complex in the world (later surpassed by Co-op City). The population was at first heavily Jewish but became mostly black in the early 1970s.
























Rochdale Village is composed of 20 buildings, each with 3 sections, 13 floors. In addition, there are two shopping malls with parking lots, 11 cooperator parking lots (3,200 spaces) and a community center. This complex has its own power plant, its own post office, police precinct, 3 schools and is surrounded by other stores on Guy R.Brewer Boulevard.

Rochdale Village library was built to serve the Rochdale Village-Springfield Gardens area . The library was planned for the north side of 137th Avenue and the west side of 173th Street. In 1965, Mayor Robert Wagner approved preliminary plans for the proposed library branch. The nearest libraries are the South Jamaica branch and the Baisley Park branch. The library was dedicated on April 21, 1969 and invited then mayor John Lindsay, Municipal Service Administrator John G. Duba, Borough President Sidney Leviss, and trustees of the Queens library board. The Rochdale Village library is the 55th branch of the Queens system.

In 1985, the Rochdale Village branch opened its new Adult Learning Center to serve adults who wanted to improve their basic reading skills. Now it has been expanded to a full-fledged center, with computer-assisted instruction and a full range of instructional materials both for learners and teachers of Adult Basic Education. 

For more than fifty-five years the air in a comparatively quiet but progressively decaying area of Queens just outside Jamaica, reverberated to the thunder of horse’s hooves as they beat around an elliptical course known as the Jamaica Race Track. Then progress in the form of a population-explosion out stripped the facilities of the Jamaica track, and on August 1, 1959 the last race was run at Jamaica. The possibilities of erecting a large housing development on the 170 acre site of the Jamaica track was the vision of Robert Moses, the then Chairman of the Slum Clearance Committee and City Construction Coordinator. The Jamaica Race Track was demolished in 1960 to make way for the complex, which was built for $ 86 million as a middle income cooperative.

Since Rochdale Village was to be the largest single cooperative housing community ever to be undertaken at that time, considerable thought was given to endowing it with an appropriate name. Because it was expected that the development would set a precedent for establishment of future “cooperative villages” around the country, the name most fitting seemed to be that of the little English village of Rochdale which gave birth to the Cooperative movement in 1844. This lead to the Rochdale Principles of Cooperation. Thus did Rochdale Village derive its name.

The architect’s concept for Rochdale Village was an attractive community covering 122 city blocks, that would provide the residents with the park-like setting and facilities of suburbia within the limits of the urban Jamaica area.

Rochdale Village in southeast Queens opened in 1963 ( pop. over 25,000), lying within South Jamaica and bounded to the north by Baisley Boulevard and Bedell Street, to the east by Bedell Street, to the south by 137th Avenue, and to the west by Guy R. Brewer Boulevard. When the village first opened in 1963 it was the largest private housing complex in the world (later surpassed by Co-op City). The population was at first heavily Jewish but became mostly black in the early 1970s.










































Rochdale Village is composed of 20 buildings, each with 3 sections, 13 floors. In addition, there are two shopping malls with parking lots, 11 cooperator parking lots (3,200 spaces) and a community center. This complex has its own power plant, its own post office, police precinct, 3 schools and is surrounded by other stores on Guy R.Brewer Boulevard.

Rochdale Village library was built to serve the Rochdale Village-Springfield Gardens area . The library was planned for the north side of 137th Avenue and the west side of 173th Street. In 1965, Mayor Robert Wagner approved preliminary plans for the proposed library branch. The nearest libraries are the South Jamaica branch and the Baisley Park branch. The library was dedicated on April 21, 1969 and invited then mayor John Lindsay, Municipal Service Administrator John G. Duba, Borough President Sidney Leviss, and trustees of the Queens library board. The Rochdale Village library is the 55th branch of the Queens system.

In 1985, the Rochdale Village branch opened its new Adult Learning Center to serve adults who wanted to improve their basic reading skills. Now it has been expanded to a full-fledged center, with computer-assisted instruction and a full range of instructional materials both for learners and teachers of Adult Basic Education.

ROCHDALE VILLAGE
was built Under the Administration of
GOVERNOR NELSON A. ROCKEFELLER
GOV. NELSON A. ROCKEFELLER  

 THE VOICE OF THE COOPERATORS
  THE JEWEL OF JAMAICA
THE ROCHDALE VILLAGE STORY

Realizing that Rochdale Village was not receiving its fair share of services from Rochdale Village, the City of New York and the State of New York, a very large group of dissatisfied Rochdale Village Cooperators got together and formed the Rochdale Village Civic Association on February 2, 1995.  This date was chosen to honor the numerous community contributions of our Treasurer, Mrs. Gwendolyn Diaz Stanley. 
 
We conduct our monthly meetings, on the third Sunday of each month in the  Community Room of Building 14, from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.
 
The Rochdale Village Civic Association covers the community of Rochdale Village, which is located on the old site of the Jamaica Race Track in Jamaica, Queens.  Our boundaries are those of the Rochdale Village Housing Cooperative, which borders Bedell Street, Baisley Boulevard, Guy R. Brewer Boulevard, 134th Avenue and 137th Avenue.
 THE ROCHDALE VILLAGE CIVIC ASSOCIATION
THE ROCHDALE VILLAGE CIVIC ASSOCIATION STORY

Meetings are held on the THIRD SUNDAY of each month in the Community Room of Building 10, 
at 170-40 130th Avenue, Rochdale Village, New York 11434, from 3 P.M. to 5 P.M.  
All meetings will start promptly at 3 P.M. 

FREE
 DATE:        SUNDAY, AUGUST 17, 2014
TIME:          3:00 P.M. to 5:00 P.M. 
 PLACE:    Bldg. 10 - Community Room
 IMPORTANT MEETING 
WORKING HARD TO IMPROVE THE QUALITY OF LIFE IN ROCHDALE VILLAGE
 R.V.C.A. "T" - SHIRTS ARE ON SALE FOR $10.00 
CALL: 718 528-7588
"T SHIRT FRONT
"T SHIRT BACK
  Gov. Rockefeller is shown observing many of the newly constructed 
  mitchell-lama affordable housing buildings at Co-op City in the Bronx.  
ARIAL VIEW OF ROCHDALE VILLAGE, NEW YORK 
RVCA MEETING PHOTOS
ROCHDALE COOPERATORS IN ATTENDANCE AT 
ROCHDALE VILLAGE CIVIC ASSOCIATION MEETINGS
= AGENDA =
 SEND US YOUR COMPLAINTS OR SUGGESTIONS 
RochVillCivAssoc@aol.com.
= GUEST SPEAKER =
New York State Senator James Sanders, Jr. 
  (5) Always Taking Compliments and/or Complaints
Be There !
Be There !
www.rochdalevillagecivicassociation.org.
HON. CLIFTON STANLEY DIAZ, PRESIDENT & HONORARY MAYOR
  (4) Discussion on New York City and State Developments
  (3) Discussion on Rochdale Village Improvements
  (2) Discussion on the Rochdale Village N.O.R.C. Program
  (1) Presentation of Award to State Senator James Sanders, Jr.